Participation is the key

We work with service users, carers, families as part of our pledge to making sure everyone can have a say in how their care is delivered and how that could be improved. We call this co-production. We recognise that people who use services have unique knowledge and experience which plays a part in their own recovery and can improve services.

The principles of co-production are:

  • Equality – everyone has assets. Assets refer to skills, abilities, time and other qualities
  • Diversity – diversity and inclusion are important values within co-production
  • Accessibility – accessibility is ensuring everyone has the same opportunity to take part fully, in a way that suits them best
  • Reciprocity – ensure that people receive something back for putting something in, and building on peoples’ needs to feel needed and valued. It is also linked to “mutuality” and all people having agreed responsibilities and expectations

Good co-production happens when:

  • Service users and carers work together to co-design, co-deliver and co-receive
  • Participation is evident at all stages in the planning, development and monitoring of services
  • Barriers and challenges that prevent developments are identified
  • Solutions are found to the barriers and challenges and put in place

 

The role of our People Participation team

Every sunset brings the promise of a new dawn

Our People Participation team are at the heart of participation and help people who use our services and carers get involved in our work and projects. People Participation Leads (PPLs) have professional and personal experience of the mental health service.

They improve communication between the Trust and service users, carers and their families and direct them to opportunities to help shape the way our services are run.

The Trust is divided into Care Groups, with a service director, clinical director, lead nurse and a PPL.

PPLs let service users know what's going on in their area and tell them about changes. Their aim is to improve their chances of success in their recovery journey.

They make sure that we hear the voices of service users and carers. By doing this, we make sure they are central to planning and delivering services.

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